Monday, 26 August 2019

Salesforce Unlocked Packages and Supplementary Code

Salesforce Unlocked Packages and Supplementary Code

Introduction

Unlocked packages have been Generally Available since the Winter 19 release, so almost a year at the time of writing (August 2019). Unlike 1.0 packaging, source of truth is the version controlled source, rather than the contents of a packaging org. In fact the only time you need anything other than a scratch org is if you are namespacing your package, in which case you’ll have to create a developer edition to annex the namespace. In packaging 2.0 the contents are determined by the code on the filesystem where you run the packaging commands and the Salesforce DX project configuration file (sfdx-project.json).

I’m not going to go into the detail of creating and publishing packages - the Trailhead module does a pretty good job of introducing the concepts, and if you want a deep dive then check out Fabien Taillon’s blog post about how Texei moved to unlocked packages (they were called Developer Controlled Packages back then, but the principles apply even if the commands have changed slightly.

SalesforceDX Project File

To generate an unlocked package, you need to define where the code lives in your SalesforceDX project file. Here’s the key part of the file for an example package:

"packageDirectories": [
        {
            "path": "force-app",
            "default": true,
            "package": "bbexample",
            "versionName": "Version 1.0",
            "versionNumber": "1.0.0.NEXT"
        }
    ]

When I run the Salesforce CLI commands to generate a package version, everything under the

force-app

directory will be added to the package and uploaded. And this to my mind is a key difference between 1.0 and 2.0 packaging. In 1.0 I create the package from the packaging org and I get to choose which components get added. In 2.0 not so much - everything that I have under the packaging directory goes in.

Supplementary Code

When I create a package there is typically a bunch of supplementary code that helps the development and test process, but I don’t want going into the package. If the package contains Lightning Web Components for example, I might have a flexipage with a  number of instances of the component showing various aspects of the functionality, allowing me to see at a glance that everything is working correctly. If the package works against generic sobjects, I might have some sample sobjects to execute tests against that I don’t want ending up in the subscriber org. I want these items available in the scratch o rgs where I’m developiing the package, but I don’t want to release them. In 1.0 I could just avoid adding them to the package, but in 2.0 I need a way to separate them from the packaged code. I could keep it in a separate repo, but that adds complexity to the development setup, and it’s always best to keep things as simple as possible.

Multiple Package Directories

The SalesforceDX project file can define multiple package directories for a single project. When you execute force:source:push, the contents of all of these directories are pushed to the scratch org, so i can store my supplementary code in another subdirectory and have it included in the development process. 

"packageDirectories": [
        {
            "path": "force-app",
            "default": true,
            "package": "bbexample",
            "versionName": "Version 1.0",
            "versionNumber": "1.0.0.NEXT"
        },
        {
            "path": “supplementary",
            "default": false
        }
    ]

When I push to my scratch org, the contents of both the force-app and supplementary subdirectories will be deployed, but when I generate a package version, only the directory with the package attribute gets included. All of my supplementary code stays out of the package and by extension the subscriber org.

There is one wrinkle to this - if I make some changes in the scratch org, when I execute force:source:pull to retrieve them, they will go into the package directory with the default attribute set to true - in this case force-app. If I don’t want these items in the package, I have to manually move them over to the supplementary subdirectory. Not a huge amount of effort but easy to forget.

Bonus - Installations via the CLI

If you haven’t used packaging in conjunction with the CLI yet, there’s one killer feature. Anyone who has worked with packaging 1.0 knows the fun and games around uploading a package, receiving the email that it has been published, then trying and failing to install it as it turns out not to be available after all. There’s a perfectly sound explanation for this - the emails means it was successfully uploaded to wherever packages live, but after that it has to be propagated around Salesforce infrastructure world, and until it’s made it to the instance you are trying to install in, you’ll get failures.

When you install via the CLI force:package:install subcommand, you can specify two wait times. The --wait switch that, like many other commands, specifies how long to wait for the command (installation) to complete, and the —publishwait that specifies how long to wait for the package to become available to the subscriber org. I typically specify big numbers for both of these switches and then fire and forget the installation. It’s a far less stressful user experience!

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