Saturday, 19 May 2018

Lightning Utility Bar Click Handling in Summer 18

Lightning Utility Bar Click Handler in Summer 18

Bar

Introduction

As I’ve written about before, I’m a big fan of the lightning utility bar.It allows me to add components to an application that persist on the screen regardless of which tab/record the user is working in/on. One area that has always been a bit of a let down is that I have no way of knowing that the user has opened the utility bar item. In our BrightMEDIA appcelerator I have some utility items that can be added to applications that can change during the application’s lifecycle as components register and deregister. While I can hook in to the original rendering, the item doesn’t get fire a rerender when it is opened, so there is nowhere for me to latch on. In this case I usually put a message up that the information may be out of date and a ‘Refresh’ button - very familiar if the user has viewed Salesforce dashboards in the past.

Enter Summer 18

This problem goes away in Summer 18 (assuming this feature goes live, forward looking statement, safe harbor etc) as the lightning;utilityBar API gets a new event handler - onUtilityClick(). As per the docs, this allows you to register an event handler that is called whenever the utility is clicked.The utility bar API is a headless service component, which is the direction Salesforce are clearly heading for this kind of functionality. The only slightly tricksy aspect to this is that the headless component needs to be rendered in the utility before it can be accessed and a handler can be registered. I tried initialising the utility component at startup ,via the standard checkbox, but everything went null. For this reason I register the event handler from a custom renderer when my utility component handles the render event.

There’s a Sample, right?

As usual I’ve created a sample component to demonstrate this new functionality - this is a utility item that shows the total open opportunity value for my pre-release org user. It executes a server side method whenever the utility is clicked to make it visible. The short video below shows how the utility refreshes itself as when it is visible and displays the correct amount, even if I’ve just edited the opportunity I’m on.

The component includes the lightning utility API :

<lightning:utilityBarAPI aura:id="utilitybar" />

Which is then located by the rendered function to register the handler (a function from the helper) :

var utilityBarAPI = component.find("utilitybar");
var eventHandler = function(response){
    helper.handleUtilityClick(component, response);
};

and the helper method checks if the component is visible, via the panelVisible function of the response parameter passed to it by the platform, and makes a call to the server to recalculate the open opportunity value and display it:

handleUtilityClick : function(cmp, response) {
    if (response.panelVisible) {
        this.recalculate(cmp);
    }
},
recalculate : function(cmp) {
    cmp.set('v.message', 'Calculating ...');
    var action = cmp.get("c.GetOpenOpportunityValue"); 

    self=this;
    action.setCallback(self, function(response) {
        var result = response.getReturnValue();
        cmp.set('v.message', 'Open opps = ' + result);
    });
    $A.enqueueAction(action);
}

You can access the entire component, and it’s Apex controller, at the 

What else can this API do?

Check out Andy Fawcett’s blog for more details.

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Friday, 11 May 2018

Lightning Component Navigation in Summer 18

Lightning Component Navigation in Summer 18

Introduction

In my last but one post (Toast Message from a Visualforce Page) I explained how I needed to solve the problem due to the force:createRecord event not respecting overrides, instead always opening the standard modal-style form and there was no GA mechanism to navigate to a component, force:navigateToComponent being still in beta.

A couple of days after, the Summer 18 release notes came out in preview and towards the end I saw that there was finally a solution for this.

lightning:isUrlAddressable Interface

The new lightning:isUrlAddressable interface allows me to expose a Lightning Component via a dedicated URL. I simply implement this on my component and my component is available at the (current) URL :

   https://<instance>.lightning.force.com/lightning//cmp/<namespace>__<component name>

However, one thing we can be certain of with Lightning Components is change, so rather than hardcoding the URL to my component, there’s a way to get the platform to dynamically generate it.

lightning:navigation Component

The new lightning:navigation component is a headless (i.e. does not have a user interface aspect) service component that exposes methods to help with navigation. The method that I’m interested in is navigate(PageReference). Using this I can create a PageReference JavaScript object that describes the location I want to navigate to and leave it up to the lightning:navigation component to figure out the appropriate URL to hit. 

The beauty of using this mechanism is that my components are decoupled from the URL format. If the Lightning Components team decide the change this, it has no impact on me - the Lightning Navigation component gets updated and everything still works as it always did.

Example

Note - as these features are part of Summer 18, at the time of writing they aren’t available outside of pre-release orgs, which was where I created my example.

I’ve created a component (WebinarOverride)that implements lightning:actionOverride, so that I can use it to override the default new action, just to show that it has no effect, and lightning:isUrlAddressable so that I can navigate to it.

<aura:component implements="force:appHostable,flexipage:availableForAllPageTypes,force:hasRecordId,lightning:actionOverride,lightning:isUrlAddressable">
	<lightning:card iconName="standard:event" title="Override">
	    <lightning:formattedText class="slds-p-left_small" 
value="This is the webinar override component."/> </lightning:card> </aura:component>

Note that it doesn’t do anything in terms of functionality, it’s just intended to obviously identify that we’ve ended up at this component.

I then have a component that can navigate to the override called, creatively, NavigationDemo:

<aura:component implements="force:appHostable,flexipage:availableForAllPageTypes">
    <lightning:navigation aura:id="navService"/>
    <lightning:button label="Force Navigate" onclick="{!c.forceNavigate}" />
    <lightning:button label="Lightning Navigate" onclick="{!c.lightningNavigate}" />
</aura:component>

That this has two buttons - one that uses force:createRecord:

var createRecordEvent = $A.get("e.force:createRecord");
createRecordEvent.setParams({
    "entityApiName": "Webinar__c"
});
createRecordEvent.fire();

and one that uses the lightning:navigation component:

var navService = cmp.find("navService");
var pageReference = {
    "type": "standard__component",
    "attributes": {
        "componentName": "c__WebinarOverride" 
    }, 
    "state": {}
};

navService.navigate(pageReference); 

Note that as the navigation aspect is provided by a headless service component, I have to locate the components via cmp.find() and then execute the method on that. Note also my pageReference object, which has a type of standard__component (even though this is a custom component - go figure) and supplies the component name as an attribute.

I’ve overridden the Lightning Experience actions for the Webinar custom object with my WebinarOverride component:

Screen Shot 2018 05 06 at 10 14 56

So clicking the New button on the webinar home page takes me to the override. If I now open my NavigationDemo component:

Screen Shot 2018 05 06 at 10 18 27

clicking the Force Navigate button is disappointing as always:

Screen Shot 2018 05 06 at 10 18 37

however, clicking on the Lightning Navigate button takes me to my WebinarOverride component:

Screen Shot 2018 05 06 at 10 18 55

You can find the full component code at the Github repository.

Conclusion

The lightning:navigate component also retires the force:navigateToComponent() function, although it’s not clear if there was a WWE-style ladder match to determine who retired. This function has had a troubled existence, leaking out before it was ready and then being withdrawn, causing wailing and gnashing of teeth in the developer community, then entering a short beta before being deprecated. Farewell little buddy, you gave it your best shot but couldn’t cut it.

The headless component mechanism feels like the way that new functionality like this will be added, rather adding functions/events etc to the framework. I guess this keeps the framework as lightweight as it can be and doesn’t force functions on applications that don’t care about them.

One additional point to note - if you forget the lightning:isUrlAddressable interface on your target component the lightning:navigation function will still happily return the URL, but when you navigate to it you will get a not particularly helpful error message that the page isn’t supported in the Lightning Experience.

Finally, I’d still prefer force:createRecord to respect overrides. While I can make my new object component configurable via a custom setting or custom metadata type, from a low code perspective I don’t want to have to change two places to use a different one. Still, we’re in a better place that we have been for a couple of years.

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Thursday, 3 May 2018

Lightning Application Events and Caching

Lightning Application Events and Caching

Spidey

Introduction

The lightning component framework has two types of event for intra-component communication:

  • Component
    Component events can be handled by the component that fired it, or any component above it in the containment hierarchy, so essentially any ancestor.

  • Application
    Application events can be handled by any ancestor, but also have an additional propagation phase that allows any component to receive the events, assuming they’ve already registered. 

I typically use application events in a broadcast scenario, where one of my components fires an event and a bunch of other components in my app receive it and take action. For example, when a user selects a value in a picklist and other components need to react to it. Which all worked fine until I had some cached pages.

Lightning Experience Caching

By default, the Lightning Experience will cache up to 5 last visited pages in order to speed up the browser back button. If I create a page that manages an account, and access this with the account id for Universal Contains and then AW Computing, both of these will be cached in the browser. This really speeds up performance, but has an unexpected side effect when using application events,

Even though the page managing Universal Containers is not visible, the components on it are still “live”. If my page has a custom component on it that receives application events, it will continue to receive application events while cached and not visible. This may not sound that bad, but in my case the component was receiving an event asking it to validate its contents and responding with another event to indicate the status. Both the component for AW Computing (that was visible) and the component for Universal Containers (that was not visible) received the event and responded to it. 

Once this happened I was caught in a classic race condition - whichever one responded first would be taken as the current state of my component. As always seems to happen with race conditions, it was the worst outcome that prevailed most of the time. I would be working on the AW Computing page, in which the component was in an invalid state, but the Universal Containers component, which was in a valid state, would respond first and processing would proceed when it should have been blocked. What it looked like at the time was that duplicate events were being fired - tracking down what was actually happening was rather a challenge.

What to do?

Sadly there was no way for the component to know that it had been cached, everything about the visible one was the same as the invisible one. I did try a solution where I destroyed the component once the user navigated off the page, but that meant that if I used the back button the page was cached but the component missing, which meant the user had to refresh the page - also not a great experience.

The actual fix was to move away from application events in this case and use component events. As the communication was between a custom component and it’s parent, it all worked fine. If that hadn’t been the case then I’d probably have MacGyvered something where (un)rendering the component updated a window expando to indicate which version is actually “live” - it would work but I’d feel a bit dirty for having to resort to such tricks.

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